Red Pepper, Yellow Pepper: “What Can I Do With…” #1

Bell peppers

Bell peppers

My closest friend threw a yellow pepper at me the other day. Really.  “What the hell am I supposed to do with this?” she hollered.  She’s pregnant, and her husband has taken over the vegetable shopping. Seduced by the alluring colors and neat packaging he sees at their local Namdharis store, he stocks their refrigerator with heaps of vegetables in a bid to get her to eat healthier food. Problem is, the exotic veggies he picks up aren’t really native to Indian cuisine, so other than sticking them in a salad, my friend doesn’t know what to do with them. Result: a plethora of expensive, shriveled up vegetables in the bottom of her fridge.  So, this series is for you, M.

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Say Cheese: Provolone, Emmental and Parmigiano Reggiano

Say Cheese

In its simplest form, cheese is essentially curdled milk. Unpleasant, but true. Ancient cultures probably discovered cheese by accident, when their milk spoiled, and they had no choice but to make use of the resultant milk solid. “Hmmm,” some ancient gourmet might have said, “a little rennet, a dash of salt, and we may have something here.” Jokes aside, the earliest pictorial evidence of cheese-making has been found in Egyptian tombs that date back to 2000 BC… and the practice probably predates the murals by over 1000 years. Keep reading…

Mmmmushrooms…

The unbearable humidity of the monsoon season provides the perfect growing environment for mushrooms. These often-overlooked gems of the forest floor are a nutritional treasure trove; they’re low in calories, fat- and cholesterol-free and contain very little sodium. On the plus side (and a very big plus it is too!), they contain lots of protein, and nutrients like selenium and riboflavin in quantities that are optimal for the human body. And, of course, they’re delicious.

Mad about mushrooms

Mad about mushrooms

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